When can I drive with dipped headlights?

When can you use dipped headlights?

You must use dipped headlights when daytime visibility is seriously reduced, generally to 100 metres (328 feet) or less. You may also use front or rear fog lights, but they must be switched off when visibility improves.

Under what circumstances must a driver use dipped headlights?

Explantion: When driving at night drivers should dip their main beam headlights when meeting or following traffic to avoid dazzling or endangering other road users.

Do you use dipped headlights at night?

Dipped lights are the brightest lights your car has that won’t dazzle other road users. Therefore, as a rule to remember, always use them when visibility is poor e.g at dusk or night time, and in bad weather.

When driving at night which vehicle lights should you turn on?

Get your lights sorted

  1. You must have your headlights on if you’re driving between 30 minutes after sunset until 30 minutes before sunrise. …
  2. When you’re following another car, keep your headlights on low (not full beam). …
  3. You must also dip your lights if you’ve stopped on the side of the road.

When you drive at night you can reduce?

New York Cheat Sheet

IT IS AMAZING:  How do I check my car headlights?
Questions Answers
When you drive at night you can reduce the problem of glare from the headlights of an approaching car by Looking to the lower right side of your lane.
When you drive in heavy fog during daylight hours you should drive with your Headlights on low beam.

When meeting a vehicle at night with one headlight you should?

The law is also known as the “Compulsory Insurance Law”. When meeting a Vehicle at night with one headlight, you should? 1. Stop where you are until the vehicle passes.

  1. Parking lights.
  2. Low beam headlights.
  3. High beam headlights.
  4. Emergency four-way flashers.

When you drive at night you can reduce the problem of glare?

To the right edge of the road. If oncoming drivers do not dim their headlights for you, keep your eyes on the right side of the road ahead. Do not look directly at the oncoming headlights because the glare may blind you for several seconds. 20.91 % of our users get this question wrong.